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Human Genome Organization

About HUGO

About HUGO

Introduction

The Human Genome Organization (HUGO) is an international organization of scientists involved in various aspects of human genetics. HUGO was conceived in 1988 at the first meeting on Genome Mapping and Sequencing at Cold Spring Harbor, New York. From an initial group of 42 scientists from 17 countries, HUGO has increased its membership to over 2,000 members, from across 92 countries in a period of two decades. Over the years, HUGO has played an essential role behind the scenes for the human genome project. With its mission to promote international collaborative efforts to study the human genome and the myriad of issues raised by our increasing knowledge of the structure and function of the human genome, HUGO has had many noteworthy successes in bringing together scholars in the field.

As a truly international organization, and currently in its 33rd year, HUGO has refocused its efforts and included the medical implications of genomic knowledge. Looking forward, HUGO is also working to enhance the genomic capabilities of the merging and developing countries of the world. The excitement and interest in genomic sciences in Asia, the Middle East, South America and Africa are all now palpable and our hope is that the latest technologies can be applied to aid national development and worldwide health.

About HUGO

Mission Statements

The Human Genome Organisation (HUGO) International seeks to bring the benefits of Genomic Sciences to Humanity by:

  • Promoting fundamental genomic research within nations and throughout the world;
  • Fostering scientific exchange in genomics with a particular emphasis on scientifically developing and emerging countries;
  • Supporting discourse in the ethics of genetics and genomics with a global perspective

About HUGO

President & Executive Board Members

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About HUGO

History

HUGO was conceived in 1988 at the first meeting on Genome Mapping and Sequencing at Cold Spring Harbor, New York. From an initial group of 42 scientists from 17 countries, HUGO has increased its membership to over 2,000 members, from across 92 countries in a period of two decades. Over the years, HUGO has played an essential role behind the scenes for the human genome project. With its mission to promote international collaborative efforts to study the human genome and the myriad of issues raised by our increasing knowledge of the structure and function of the human genome, HUGO has had many noteworthy successes in bringing together scholars in the field.